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Flawless Human Beings » Gina Torres » Gina Torres Alphabet

↳ F → feminism & representation
"I certainly came up in an era where women were really making strides and making a point to beat down doors and find their place, and crash through the glass ceiling. And a lot of them did that believing that they had to trade on their femininity and that they had to be a man and tap into whatever they believed was a masculine trait to hang in the boys’ room, to get the "keys to the kingdom" as it were. And what’s beautiful about Jessica Pearson is that she is the next level to that when, really, feminism is about being all that you are and not having to trade one thing for another on your way up, or apologize." - Gina Torres (about her character Jessica Pearson, on Suits)

THAT QUOTE^

"A lot of them believed they had to trade on their femininity and be a man"

(via catedrals)

thepushyqueenofsluttown:

warrior-skyscraper:

Maybe people should learn to control themselves

This is gross. Gymnastics isn’t over-sexualized because of leotards. It’s over-sexualized because creepy grown adults sexualize and fetishize young girls. Guess what? They’d still do it if the athletes were allowed to wear shorts. They’d still do it if the athletes wore head to toe one piece footie pajamas. You know why? Because it’s not about the attire. At all. It’s about grown men being disgusting pigs toward young women, which happens every day in every aspect of life, not just in the gym where gymnasts happen to wear leotards.

I think girls in leotards are more liable to sexual comments than girls covered head-to-toe, because more is exposed. I also think this is totally gross and sad.
(More in response to the original poster) However, I think the way to stop sexualization of young female athletes is NOT to encourage girls to wear shorts or more clothing… This only worsens the problem. A girl should be comfortable wearing anything she wants and be free of sexual harassment. She should be able to wear a full-length dress and a leotard, and feel just as good about herself in both, and people should treat her the same.
By making girls cover up, we’re teaching them that they are inherently sexual objects and responsible for their creepy sexualization, when in fact it is the observer’s fault.
If society stopped placing standards on clothing, and creating arbitrary parts of desire, I think we’d have much fewer issues.

thepushyqueenofsluttown:

warrior-skyscraper:

Maybe people should learn to control themselves

This is gross. Gymnastics isn’t over-sexualized because of leotards. It’s over-sexualized because creepy grown adults sexualize and fetishize young girls. Guess what? They’d still do it if the athletes were allowed to wear shorts. They’d still do it if the athletes wore head to toe one piece footie pajamas. You know why? Because it’s not about the attire. At all. It’s about grown men being disgusting pigs toward young women, which happens every day in every aspect of life, not just in the gym where gymnasts happen to wear leotards.

I think girls in leotards are more liable to sexual comments than girls covered head-to-toe, because more is exposed. I also think this is totally gross and sad.

(More in response to the original poster) However, I think the way to stop sexualization of young female athletes is NOT to encourage girls to wear shorts or more clothing… This only worsens the problem. A girl should be comfortable wearing anything she wants and be free of sexual harassment. She should be able to wear a full-length dress and a leotard, and feel just as good about herself in both, and people should treat her the same.

By making girls cover up, we’re teaching them that they are inherently sexual objects and responsible for their creepy sexualization, when in fact it is the observer’s fault.

If society stopped placing standards on clothing, and creating arbitrary parts of desire, I think we’d have much fewer issues.

(Source: gymfanconfessions)

In San Francisco last year, a man stabbed a woman in the face and arm after she didn’t respond positively to his sexually harassing her on the street.

In Bradenton, Fla., a man shot a high school senior to death after she and her friends refused to perform oral sex at his request.

In Chicago, a scared 15-year-old was hit by a car and died after she tried escaping from harassers on a bus.

Again, in Chicago, a man grabbed a 19-year-old walking on a public thoroughfare, pulled her onto a gangway and assaulted her.

In Savannah, Georgia, a woman was walking alone at night and three men approached her. She ignored them, but they pushed her to the ground and sexually assaulted her.

In Manhattan, a 29-year-old pregnant woman was killed when men catcalling from a van drove onto the sidewalk and hit her and her friend.

Last week, a runner in California — a woman — was stopped and asked, by a strange man in a car, if she wanted a ride. When she declined he ran her over twice.

FUCK YOU if you think that street harassment is a “compliment” or “no big deal” or that it’s “irrational” of us to be afraid because “what’s actually gonna happen.” Fuck you, fuck you, fuck you some more.

Street Harassment: Is a Man Running Over a 14-Year Old Girl for Refusing Sex Serious Enough? | Soraya Chemaly  (via mooncrumbs)

Whoever says street harassment is a compliment has obviously never experienced it.

(Source: brutereason, via foregoingsanity)

Every first draft is perfect, because all a first draft has to do is exist.

Jane Smiley (via inspired-to-write)

Somehow this is the most inspiring thing I’ve read in a long time. I’m going to go write now.

(via joleebindo)

this is a good way of looking at it

(via theroguefeminist)

(via catedrals)

latimes:

Made-to-order poetry in Los Angeles

Jacqueline Suskin, a writer and former vegetable gardener, has taken to the Hollywood Farmers Market for her latest venture: The Poem Store.

Sitting with her typewriter, Suskin takes requests from curious passersby and regulars, taking requests for poems on back pain to making verse fit the title “Since Wednesday.”

As for the most popular request?

"Everyone is always asking for love poems," she says. "We are all obsessed with love."

But love, as a topic, is deeply unspecific. When someone asks her to write a poem about love, she responds by asking what kind of love. That usually leads to a story about a girlfriend living far

away, or a person new to Los Angeles desperately missing her family, or the love a mother has for her new baby.

She thinks people ask for poems that help them understand their path or direction in life.

"They want hope, or confidence, or they just need someone to see who they are," she says. "Half the time I feel like I am a therapist or a psychic."

Read more of reporter Deborah Netburn’s story in our latest Column One feature.

Photos: Katie Falkenberg / Los Angeles Times

(via catedrals)

ospreying:

zxcvfgdy:

Human Feelings as Drugs

It would be really cool to have a movie about this in a world where the government distributes these to people, and at first glance everything is fine, people with depression and antisocial disorder are being instantly treated and that’s great. But then you realize that there are groups of people abusing these drugs underground, like there will be people on happy all the time, people that use hope to delude themselves, or people that drug other people with love, and that true human emotions have been nearly wiped out. Then at the end it’s discovered that the government is using these drugs to control society and manipulate people into becoming soldiers by taking away their empathy and filling them up with trust for the government. So it ends in an uprising led by a resistance group who lead the people to realize that their humanity has been stripped and doesn’t come in a bottle.

(via madgi-do)